Health News Review

I’ve grown accustomed to nearly spitting out my coffee over many things in my morning paper.

Still, an ad for an “accidental bowel leakage” product darn near had me spewing my French Roast Colombian all over the paper the other day.

First, let me emphasize that I know there’s undoubtedly a need being served by this product.  And I am not belittling that need.

I am only commenting on the marketing. Just one more little observation about how health care marketing dominates our media consumption.

But I learned something.  I learned that what we used to call “fecal incontinence” is now ABL.  And there it is advertised in my morning paper right alongside snow tire sales and department store sales and travel agency ads trying to get me out of Minnesota in January.

So ABL joins the Hall of Fame of health care condition acronyms created largely by drug companies or others selling health care products.

Can you provide the full name for the following acronyms AND what the condition used to be called? (Quiz answers appear at the very end of this article.)

  • ED
  • EIB
  • OAB
  • BBS
  • GAD
  • SAD
  • HSDD
  • ES caused by SWD or OSA

Before we give you the quiz answers, here’s news about another new marketing twist.  A billboard outside the Denver Broncos’ football stadium, capitalizing on the All-Pro performance of quarterback Peyton Manning to urge men to join those who are “manning up” and having vasectomies. Thanks to Deadspin.com for bringing this to our attention.

 

Now, here are your quiz answers.  A free vasectomy to anyone who answered them all correctly.  You just have to go to Denver to pick up your prize.

OBHCM, I remain THNW.

(Overwhelmed By Health Care Marketing, I remain, The Health News Watchdog.)

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Comments

Frugal Nurse posted on January 8, 2014 at 10:19 am

How about one of my favorites–PBA, or pseudobulbar affect disorder. The makers of Nuedexta (Avanir) began a media push last year to increase awareness of this condition (which probably doesn’t affect any one actually watching the commercials) in a probable attempt to expand off-label use. Funny, though, I haven’t seen any commercials for it lately.