Health News Review
  • Mar 19 2015

    Nick Bilton blames readers for not knowing who Joseph Mercola is

    The following is a guest post by Kevin Lomangino, managing editor of HealthNewsReview.org. He tweets as @Klomangino.  The New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan has an excellent post up about the fear-mongering cancer story that I wrote about yesterday. She acknowledges that the coverage on this story was lacking in many ways. She also notes that Nick Bilton [...]

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  • Mar 18 2015

    Why is the New York Times turning to Joseph Mercola as an expert on cancer risk?

    The following is a guest post by Kevin Lomangino, managing editor of HealthNewsReview.org. He tweets as @Klomangino.  Alert reader Bahar Gholipour (@Alterwired on Twitter) pointed us to a story appearing in today’s New York Times Style section about the potential cancer risks posed by wearable technology such as the new Apple Watch. With Gary out of the office [...]

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  • Mar 5 2015

    How much overdetection in cancer screening is acceptable?

    A paper in The BMJ, “People’s willingness to accept overdetection in cancer screening: population survey,” paints a picture of how difficult is the challenge of trying to inform and educate patients and health care consumers about over detection. The study tried to address what level of overdetection people would find acceptable in screening for bowel, [...]

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  • Feb 24 2015

    Stop blaming “demanding patients” for driving up health care costs

    A recent JAMA Oncology paper by Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel and colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania, “Patient Demands and Requests for Cancer Tests and Treatments,” is worth a look. The authors note that: “Surveyed physicians tend to place responsibility for high medical costs more on “demanding patients” than themselves. However, there are few data about the [...]

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  • Feb 17 2015

    Sensational language – scary & fawning – in USNWR story on Cologuard colon cancer test

    Earlier this month, US News & World Report published a story, “Meet Cologuard: The Colon Cancer Test You Can Take At Home.” It profiles a man who had what is described as a “gruesome” experience from a colonoscopy 35 years ago – so bad “that he vowed never to have another screening test for colorectal [...]

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  • Feb 5 2015

    More Bow Tie, Less Glitz Please: Breast Cancer Vaccine Promises Don’t Serve Readers/Viewers

    The following is a guest blog post from one of our new contributors, Alan Cassels, who is an author, journalist, and drug policy researcher with an interest in how clinical research and experience on pharmaceuticals gets translated for policy-makers, prescribers and consumers. ——————— Sometimes a news story feels like a scientific conference.  Half the time you’re [...]

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  • Feb 4 2015

    Two noteworthy breast cancer articles: women who turn down mammography…and questions about precision medicine

    Women’s magazines are often not the place to go for hard-hitting, evidence-based health care stories.  That’s not just my opinion.  That’s what I’ve heard through the years from many women who try to write such pieces for women’s magazines. But here’s an exception to that pattern:  Laura Beil’s piece in O, The Oprah Magazine, entitled, [...]

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  • Jan 28 2015

    Can we learn anything from Japanese study of cancer news reporting?

    A new analysis, “How do medical journalists treat cancer-related issues?” was published in the journal ecancermedicalscience It’s by Japanese researchers looking at Japanese news coverage.  An excerpt of their findings: “This study provides important information about journalists who publish articles on cancer. First, the selection of topics is clearly biased; for example, aggressive treatments and [...]

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  • Jan 14 2015

    Important and rare: A science reporter’s reflections on a controversial story

    On ScienceInsider for the American Association for the Advance of Science, science writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel writes, “Bad luck and cancer: A science reporter’s reflections on a controversial story.” She looks back at the brouhaha caused by a paper published in Science on January 2, by a news release from Johns Hopkins University (home of the paper’s [...]

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  • Jan 5 2015

    Alan Cassels guest blog post: PSA test – good myths die hard

    Alan Cassels, who is a pharmaceutical policy researcher at the University of Victoria, British Columbia,  a journalist, and author of the books  “Seeking Sickness” and “The ABCs of Disease Mongering”,  sent in this unsolicited guest blog post.  Soon, we hope to solicit more pieces from Cassels. Matthew Tully wrote on the Indy Star website on December 16th, [...]

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