Health News Review
  • Feb 22 2014

    Nonivasive heart imaging tests lead to invasive tests but not to better outcomes

    I found a Medscape story about the following.  Nothing else.  Granted, I can’t see/find everything, so I may have missed some reporting on this.  But nothing jumped out at me in a web search.  Why not? A paper in JAMA Internal Medicine, “Hospital Variation in the Use of Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging and Its Association With [...]

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  • Oct 4 2013

    Imbalance in reporting on Alzheimer’s PET scan research

    Just two weeks ago, CBS reported on PET scans for Alzheimer’s disease, “New scan may diagnose Alzheimer’s as brain changes occur,” based on a study in the journal Neuron.  (Do they scour this journal all the time?) Just four days ago, the Washington Post reported on “good news on Alzheimer’s: Better ways to diagnose it.“  [...]

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  • Feb 3 2013

    A few health care news gems from the past week that you may have missed

    The New Yorker profile of Dr. Oz, “The Operator: Is the most trusted doctor in America doing more harm than good?” The NPR piece, “Hanging A Price Tag On Radiology Tests Didn’t Change Doctors’ Habits.” PharmedOut.org’s new Drug Ads teaching tool.  It’s a three-part slideshow covering misleading advertising in  medical journals, indirect marketing, and disease-mongering; [...]

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  • Dec 6 2012

    Incomplete MPR reporting on Mayo prostate cancer scan

    I’m a big fan of Minnesota Public Radio and usually a big fan of their health care news coverage. They’ve done some bold and innovative coverage in recent years. But when I heard (on the radio) and saw (online) MPR’s story, “Prostate cancer scan advance helps Mayo doctors with early detection,” I saw some red [...]

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  • Oct 25 2012

    ABC corrects earlier story about Bill Weir’s “lifesaving” CT scan

    Call it a retraction.  Call it a correction.  Call it important to correct the record. Back in January, I led the charge in criticizing ABC’s Bill Weir for his report on Dr. David Agus’ book, “The End of Illness,” and Weir’s claim that a CT scan Agus recommended may have saved Weir’s life.  You can [...]

    4 Comments
  • Oct 9 2012

    The evolution of a story: hospital “selling scans” makes it into final headline

    I had never met Jim Walsh of the Star Tribune, but he called me recently about a story he was working on.  I’m glad he did, because I think our conversation (and subsequent conversations with people to whom I referred him) may have altered the direction of the final product. I hadn’t realized that Walsh [...]

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  • Jun 13 2012

    Scanning the news about concerns over explosion in medical imaging scans

    In case you missed them, many stories reported on a new analysis of the explosion in the use of CT, MRI and other advanced imaging methods. The Los Angeles Times: “Use of imaging tests soars, raising questions on radiation risk.” Researchers looked at “data from patients enrolled in six large health maintenance organizations,” and “found [...]

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  • Mar 12 2012

    Online “Daily Deal” coupon for preventive MRI scan – disease-mongering du jour

    Some of the Groupon, Living Social, Daily Deal offerings are getting a little crazy. Here’s one I got today. The ad copy is astounding: Been dealing with a minor ache or pain? Get it checked out today! Once in a while, you may experience an enlightening moment in your life. This experience may change the [...]

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  • Mar 9 2012

    Patient POV on waste, quality of care, imaging issues

    Journalist Laura Newman, on her Patient POV blog, posts, “MR Imaging, Electronic Test Ordering Creates Waste.” She writes: Waste is what you get with rampant, uncritical use of MRI and health information technology, according to two papers out this week.  The authors of a companion editorial to one of the papers even go so far [...]

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  • Sep 6 2011

    Criticisms of CNN’s “The Last Heart Attack”

    The following is a guest blog post by Marilyn Mann, a securities lawyer who became interested in medical research while researching treatment options for her teenage daughter, who has heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic disease that causes very high LDL-cholesterol. She blogs at http://marilynmann.wordpress.com/. ———————————————————————— “Oh no he didn’t.” That was my first reaction when, [...]

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