Health News Review
  • Feb 7 2013

    How the same “independent” sources pop up in competing stories – or, is this the scientific embargo version of insider trading?

    Just a few weeks ago, HealthNewsReview.org analyzed several stories on a study of berries and women’s heart health. In our review of a HealthDay story, we noted: The story quotes two independent experts, preventive cardiologist Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum and nutritionist Dana Greene. We wish that the experts were quoted on a more analytical view of [...]

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  • Feb 5 2013

    Should We Trust the NEJM Obesity Mythbusters?

    The following is a guest post by Kevin Lomangino, one of our story reviewers on HealthNewsReview.org. He is an independent medical journalist and editor who is currently Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Nutrition Insight, a monthly evidence-based newsletter which reviews the scientific literature on nutrition for physicians and dietitians. He tweets as @Klomangino. —————————————————- Last week, the [...]

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  • Feb 4 2013

    Sound Medicine radio program profiles work of HealthNewsReview.org

    This public radio program in Indiana interviewed me in response to the paper by John Ioannidis and colleagues in JAMA, “Empirical Evaluation of Very Large Treatment Effects of Medical Interventions.” You can listen to the 12-minute segment online. A few of the points I tried to make: Oftentimes, if it sounds too good to be [...]

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  • Jan 25 2013

    Ghostwriting part 3: psych drug Paxil – and conclusion

    The GlaxoSmithKline psychiatric drug Paxil is the topic of the third and final part of a series of unsolicited guest blog submissions by Jonathan Leo, PhD, and Jeffrey Lacasse, PhD. ——————————— Paxil, GlaxoSmithKline, and the University of Pennsylvania In June of 2012 charges of ghostwriting were made by a University of Pennsylvania Professor over a [...]

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  • Jan 25 2013

    Week-ending roundup of health care news gems you may have missed

    Flu Follies:  CNN’s Piers Morgan Falls Ill Days After Getting Flu Shot On The Air From Dr. Oz. Should Journalists Cite Material from Predatory Journals? – Scholarly Open Access blog. Eve Harris, who recently took a fulltime job as a patient navigator at UCSF,  published her “coming out” piece, as she calls it -  “Skin [...]

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  • Jan 24 2013

    Ghostwriting series part 2: Medtronic’s InFuse spinal fusion surgery product

    In the second part of their 3-part guest blog series on ghostwriting of medical papers, researchers Jonathan Leo, PhD, and Jeffrey Lacasse, PhD address “Medtronics, InFuse and the University of Wisconsin.” —————————————– InFuse, manufactured by Medtronic and approved by the FDA in 2002, is used for promoting the growth of bone graft material during surgery.  [...]

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  • Jan 24 2013

    “The risk that press reports would fall into the trap of reporting this study as definitive”

    A paper in JAMA Internal Medicine this week, “The Association of Aspirin Use With Age-Related Macular Degeneration,” concluded: “..from this prospective population-based cohort that regular aspirin use is associated with a 2-fold increase in risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) during a 15-year period. These findings appear to be independent of cardiovascular disease, smoking, and [...]

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  • Jan 23 2013

    Introducing a three-part series on medical journal ghostwriting

    Today we publish part one of a three-part guest blog series that came to us in an unsolicited submission.  But because we’ve followed the two authors’ work, we are pleased to accept and pass along their thoughts.  Here is the first of the series by Jonathan Leo, PhD, and Jeffrey Lacasse, Ph.D. Part One: When Should [...]

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  • Nov 27 2012

    Heart journals ask scientist-authors to do what we’ve been teaching journalists for years

    For years we have been coaxing and educating journalists – and the general public – to understand that the language used to describe studies – especially observational studies – is important. We have published a primer, “Does the Language Fit the Evidence?  Association Versus Causation.” Well don’t feel picked on any longer, journalists.  Some journals [...]

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  • Nov 5 2012

    “Embargoes… can be bad for the public health.”

    Let’s start the week with some embargo issues!  How’s that for fun? On the NPR Shots blog, David Schultz writes, “What We Wanted To Tell You About Mumps But Couldn’t.”   He begins: Last week, we wrote about an outbreak of mumps within several Orthodox Jewish communities in and around New York City. We told [...]

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