Health News Review
  • Jan 23 2015

    Squelching rage when reading “Twitter knows when you’re going to have a heart attack”

    That was the headline of a UPI.com story that began:  “Twitter’s fast pace and knack for promoting public spats can surely raise heart rates and get the proverbial blood boiling, but the platform known for hashtags and half-formed thoughts can also predict heart attacks — or at least rates of heart disease.” It’s a story [...]

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  • Jan 21 2015

    Cleveland Clinic Tweets Misleading Claim That Lives On and On

    The following is the first guest blog post from one of our new contributors, veteran health care journalist Trudy Lieberman. Another veteran, Andrew Holtz, also contributes.  I shudder to think that, among the 3 of us, we have well more than 100 years of journalism experience, but I’m thankful for what that means in bringing [...]

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  • Jan 20 2015

    “Potential biomarker that could predict”? – caveats about psychiatric brain imaging & blogging about it

    The following is a guest blog post by Susan Molchan, MD.  Dr. Molchan is a psychiatrist in practice in Bethesda, Maryland. She also trained in nuclear medicine and did PET research at the National Institute of Mental Health, and worked as the program director for Biomarkers, Diagnosis, and Alzheimer’s Disease at the National Institute on [...]

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  • Sep 23 2014

    Proton beam: should a news organization “partner” with providers to promote in the face of intense debate?

    On the same day that the Mayo Clinic co-hosted a Twitter chat about “The Role of Proton Beam Therapy in Cancer Care”….. ……Kaiser Health News published a story, “Insurers Hesitant To Cover Many Proton Beam Therapy Treatments.” Included in that story was the news that: “some insurers and disease experts say that, until there’s better [...]

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  • Aug 24 2014

    Questions about the ice bucket challenge

    A story in the Cincinnati Enquirer, “Ice bucket challenge? Here’s where  your money goes,” is worth a look. It doesn’t make any statement about what’s right or wrong or good or bad about the campaign.  It simply states facts, based on what the reporter found on Guidestar.org.  Excerpts: “The (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis – ALS) association [...]

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  • Aug 22 2014

    Dr. Peter Bach on “Avoiding the Breast Cancer ‘Warrior’ Trap”

    I clearly remember struggling with if/what I should write about Amy Robach of ABC News and her on-air and online statements about her own breast cancer diagnosis and treatment – and what it might mean for other women. I finally decided, and published “There’s another side to the Amy Robach breast cancer story,” becoming one [...]

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  • Jul 11 2014

    Creative YouTube videos by MDs can educate & entertain

    I’ve written about ZDoggMD.com videos before. If you’re hooked on House of Cards, you may appreciate his Frank Underwood impersonation in this video in which he persuades an anti-vaccine mother to do the right thing.   Aaron Carroll tries to educate viewers about “Number Needed to Treat: Treatments Don’t Work Like You Think They Work” [...]

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  • Feb 5 2014

    Dueling diseases…competing cancer causes…my cancer is worse than your cancer

    An article on Salon, ” ‘I wish I had breast cancer’: The latest terrible cancer campaign,” criticizes the Pancreatic Cancer Action organization for its latest “awareness” campaign.   In it, a man says “I wish I had testicular cancer” and a woman says “I wish I had breast cancer.” The author of the Salon piece [...]

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  • Jan 23 2014

    A patient advocate’s powerful piece on Lisa Bonchek Adams and the Kellers’ criticism – the DCIS Sea of Uncertainty

    I’ve been slow to comment on the firestorm of criticism that arose when Emma Keller of The Guardian questioned the Twitter messages by Lisa Bonchek Adams, a young woman with stage IV breast cancer. I haven’t felt the need to comment since so many people have done such a thorough job of writing about this [...]

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  • Nov 22 2013

    Do social networks spread or drown health & science news?

    A Scientific American blog posts a review of a book, Social Networks and Popular Understanding of Science and Health: Sharing Disparities.  It’s written by my friend and former faculty colleague, Brian Southwell.  We worked together in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota.  He’s now program director for Science in [...]

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