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Kaiser Health News: 7 health care changes you might have missed

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Kaiser Health News proves its value once again with an under-the-radar story covering some items you won’t see in many other news sources.

Excerpt:

“…several lesser-known provisions also take effect in coming months that could have a lasting impact on the nation’s health care system.

These provisions include eliminating patients’ co-payments for certain preventive services such as mammograms, giving the government more power to review health insurers’ premium increases and allowing states to expand Medicaid coverage to low-income adults without children.

While these changes might not have gotten at lot of attention, they could help build support for the law in the run-up to the contentious mid-term elections.”

Their list:

• Prevention For Less
• Knowing Which Treatments Work Best
• Helping Cover Early Retirees’ Health Costs
• Keeping Tabs on Health Insurance Premiums
• Expanded Medicaid Coverage
• Care Coordination for ‘Dual Eligibles’
• FDA Approval For ‘Follow-On Biologics’

Read the full story at the link above for details.

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Comments

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Wellescent Health Blog

July 12, 2010 at 3:21 pm

Encouraging prevention my making screenings and other preventative medicine cheaper is a very important step in cost containment and will be good for the policy holders both in the short and long term. However, it is unfortunate that this news is still under the radar because unless awareness campaigns are launched to get people to act, few of these benefits will be realized.