Lots of White Coat, Black Art or Black Hat analogies going around

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I was interviewed by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s “White Coat, Black Art” program about news coverage of the much ballyhooed “Zamboni procedure” for multiple sclerosis. That interview kicks off the first program of the first full season of the “White Coat, Black Art” program on CBC this weekend, but an audio portion of the program is now posted on the CBC website.

Screen shot 2010-09-08 at 9.31.41 AM.jpg

WCBH-bookcoversmall.jpg At the same time, I’m kicking myself for not yet having read my friend Carl Elliott’s new book, “White Coat, Black Hat: Adventures on the Dark Side of Medicine.” Elliott, a leading voice in bioethics, turned over creation of a book-promoting website to his brother, who built one of the funniest spoofs of a book-promoting-website you’ll ever see.

In possible deference to Strunk & White’s, “The Elements of Style” and its call for omitting needless words, the site wows you with this introductory high-pressure sales pitch:

White Coat Black Hat is a book. It is about doctors and drugs and bad guys.

Also, it is about doctors who become bad guys (they sell drugs).

If this sounds interesting to you, go to Amazon.com and buy the book there.

We will update this page whenever Carl gets around to sending us something (like a copy of the book, for example. Or a summary. Or blurbs. Or anything). For now, we’ll just make stuff up.

A white hat to both Carl (for the book) and his brother (for the spoof).

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Britt Elliott

September 8, 2010 at 11:26 am

What spoof?

Smileatfear

September 8, 2010 at 3:00 pm

The reputation of doctors is going the way of used car salesmen and politicians. Time for doctors to police their own and recognize that they must avoid even the appearance of conflicts of interest. No doctor should be prescribing a drug that they helped develop or for which they have become a paid spokesman. Judges and lawyers recuse themselves for less.