Note to our followers: Our nearly 13-year run of daily publication of new content on HealthNewsReview.org came to a close at the end of 2018. Publisher Gary Schwitzer and other contributors may post new articles periodically. But all of the 6,000+ articles we have published contain lessons to help you improve your critical thinking about health care interventions. And those will be still be alive on the site for a couple of years.
4/20/2006

Reasons for improved longevity in U.S.?

OK, so many news stories today are reporting the new statistics suggesting (with lots of head-scratching and remaining doubts by some observers) that the U.S. had the biggest single-year decline in deaths since 1938. If true, who or what gets the credit? The Star Tribune, in its first sentence,says it’s “a powerful testament to medical […]

2 4/18/2006

Thousands go to HealthNewsReview.org

First day traffic to the new HealthNewsReview.org website was strong yesterday, with thousands of journalists and consumers visiting the site. Public comment has been overwhelmingly positive. Merrill Goozner of the Center for Science in the Public Interest wrote on his blog: “…I’m hoping a new effort by journalism professor Gary Schwitzer of the University of […]

2 4/17/2006

Debut of HealthNewsReview.org

I’m proud to unveil a project I’ve been working on for 8 months. Please visit HealthNewsReview.org to see a new attempt to help improve health journalism in the U.S. A team of more than 20 reviewers from journalism, medicine, public health and health services research will evaluate and grade health news stories that include claims […]

4/16/2006

Launching The Site

HealthNewsReview.org is an attempt to help improve the accuracy, balance and completeness of news stories that make claims about new ideas in health care. It is not intended to belittle the hard work of well-intentioned journalists. I covered health and medical news on a daily basis for 15 years and I know about deadline pressures. […]

4/13/2006

More fake news followup – from the nation's 2nd biggest market

Here’s more followup to the Center for Media & Democracy’s report on the use of Video News Releases last week. The LA Daily News picked up the story and reported that one of the culprit TV stations found to use VNRs is in that second biggest TV market in the country – KABC. They reported: […]

3/20/2006

"Just add water" TV health reporting

The Grade the News (GTN) website reports on the questionable medical “reportingâ€? done by syndicated TV and radio celebrity Dr. Dean Edell, who calls himself “America’s Doctor.â€? Edell appears on San Francisco’s KGO Channel 7 with introductions that often say, “Dr. Dean Edell reports.â€? But the story points out that Edell does no original reporting […]

3/16/2006

Crusading for colon cancer without evidence

Katie Couric and the NBC Today Show are at it again, with a weeklong series entitled “Confronting Colon Cancer,” and a subtheme of “The Fight For More Screening.” I heard today’s segment and do not yet have access to a transcript. But what I heard was a confusing jumble of recommendations – some of which […]

3/14/2006

Cascade of cardiology stories

Sorry I’ve been a little slow with posts in the past few days. First, there’s digging out from under a foot of new snow in the Twin Cities. Second, there’s digging out from under an avalanche of cardiology-related news coming out of the American College of Cardiology meeting. It reminds me of the excellent paper […]

3/9/2006

More questions about TV health news

A study in this month’s American Journal of Managed Care (not to be published online until next week) confirms some of what I’ve reported in earlier studies: local TV health news is troublesome. (The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has a story on the study.) Researchers from the University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin-Madison analyzed […]

2 3/4/2006

Health journalists can't rely on the news release

CJRDaily.org features an interview with Wall Street Journal health columnist Tara Parker-Pope. The interview focuses on her opinion that “a flawed communications effort led to widespread misinterpretation of results by the news media and the public” regarding the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and its findings on how low-fat diets, consumption of calcium and vitamin D, […]

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