These podcasts are driven by our passion for improving the public dialogue about health care. You’ll hear from leading physicians, researchers, and journalists. But you’ll also hear patient stories, some of them talking about how they were harmed by misleading media messages.
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4 11/13/2017

Podcast: Victor Montori – Mayo Clinic MD calls for patient revolution

Having a conversation with Victor Montori you can almost feel your hair blow back.

If he were introduced at a medical conference you’d probably get something like this: Mayo Clinic diabetes physician, author of roughly 600 publications, world-class expert in shared decision-making and evidence-based medicine, director of Mayo’s Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, and an advisor to The BMJ and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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10/26/2017

Podcast: Conflicts of interest at World Conference of Science Journalists

Today marks the opening of the 10th World Conference of Science Journalists in San Francisco.

Over 1,300 people will be in attendance, and that’s a big number.

But there’s an even bigger number that may not get as much attention but really should: The conference is receiving $400,000 from biomedical giant, Johnson & Johnson, and another $200,000 from various companies such as Bayer, Sanofi, 23andMe, and AstraZeneca.

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10/10/2017

Podcast: Allen Frances, MD – A psychiatrist’s take on the DSM, Pharma, and Donald Trump

Is President Donald Trump mentally ill?

Do we really need over 500 psychiatric diagnoses?

What do the changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (or ‘DSM’ for short) over the past 60+ years say about psychiatry? The influence of industry? Us?

This conversation with renowned psychiatrist, Allen Frances MD — although just over 10 minutes long — touches on all of the above and much more. Trust me, he’s not shy.

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9/14/2017

Podcast: Health care costs – ‘a problem hiding in plain sight’

Why are health care costs kept so secret? And medical bills so hard to understand?

When you buy a car, book a flight, or put things in your grocery cart, you not only know the price in advance, but you can also shop around for the best price.

But for most health care services you can’t. And former New York Times editor and reporter, Jeanne Pinder, thinks that makes no sense at all. So much so that she started ClearHealthCosts.com, a project of journalists “committed to bringing transparency to the health-care marketplace by telling people prices for medical procedures and items.”

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8/1/2017

PODCAST: The Wild West of stem cells

Stem cell clinics are booming. And hurting people.

How can patients protect themselves in a marketplace where the Food & Drug Administration (FDA), Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and state medical boards have been ineffectual?

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4 7/17/2017

Podcast: Newly-revised List of Industry-Independent Experts for Journalists

If anyone ever says that he or she can’t find an industry-independent expert for a news story or for an FDA committee, they just haven’t looked hard enough.

For 9 years, we have hosted what is, to the best of our knowledge, a one-of-a-kind list of health care industry-independent experts.

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7/10/2017

PODCAST: DCIS … searching for clarity

What is DCIS, or ductal carcinoma in situ? Is it an incidental abnormality that only became recognized as screening mammography became more widespread and sophisticated?

Or, is it a pre-cancer that gives doctors a head start in treating breast cancer before it spreads?

These are questions that nearly 60-thousand women are faced with each year in this country.

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5/31/2017

PODCAST: Memoirs of a female surgeon

Only 7 percent of orthopedic surgeons in the United States are women.

Dr. Julie Switzer is one of them.

In this podcast we touch on gender, but we mostly address two other topics. First, is Switzer’s passion for caring for the elderly who sustain fractures. Second, the emerging sports focus in how orthopedics is covered by the media, and marketed to the public.

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5/4/2017

PODCAST: Why would a 23-year-old graduate student choose to live in a nursing home?

About 6 percent of older Americans live in nursing homes. However, nearly half of us over the age of 65 will spend some time in a nursing home at some point in our life.

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2 4/20/2017

PODCAST: Wellness programs – do they work?

Wellness programs in the United States are an $8 billion industry.

Over 50 million Americans are enrolled in such programs. They are as variable in size and quality as the companies and organizations that offer them.

In this podcast you’ll hear 3 voices:

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