Note to our followers: Due to a lack of sufficient funding, HealthNewsReview.org will cease daily publication of new content at the end of 2018. Publisher Gary Schwitzer and other contributors may post new articles periodically. If you wish to donate, your gift might help keep the site available to the public for a few more years, by defraying costs of web hosting and maintenance. All of our 6,000+ published articles contain lessons to help people improve their critical thinking about health care. Read more about our change in status. And here's how to make a donation.

Podcast: Conflicts of interest at World Conference of Science Journalists

Michael Joyce produces multimedia at HealthNewsReview.org and tweets as @mlmjoyce

Today marks the opening of the 10th World Conference of Science Journalists in San Francisco.

Over 1,300 people will be in attendance, and that’s a big number.

But there’s an even bigger number that may not get as much attention but really should: The conference is receiving $400,000 from biomedical giant, Johnson & Johnson, and another $200,000 from various companies such as Bayer, Sanofi, 23andMe, and AstraZeneca.

In this podcast we ask the question: Should health care journalists — or their professional organizations — take money from the people they report on regularly?

In the podcast I mention this primer: The Trail of Tainted Funding. Our team invested a lot of effort in making this a go-to site for learning more about conflicts of interest in healthcare, academics, public relations, and journalism.

It’s a living and breathing document that we keep up-to-date with specific examples of these troublesome relationships. I very highly recommend it as both a starting point, and long-term reference.

Comments

We Welcome Comments. But please note: We will delete comments left by anyone who doesn’t leave an actual first and last name and an actual email address.

We will delete comments that include personal attacks, unfounded allegations, unverified facts, product pitches, or profanity. We will also end any thread of repetitive comments. Comments should primarily discuss the quality (or lack thereof) in journalism or other media messages about health and medicine. This is not intended to be a forum for definitive discussions about medicine or science. Nor is it a forum to share your personal story about a disease or treatment -- your comment must relate to media messages about health care. If your comment doesn't adhere to these policies, we won't post it. Questions? Please see more on our comments policy.